Third Prototype: Insulated Copper Tube Antenna

March 4, 2011 at 11:11 am 10 comments

Alright, so here’s my completed third prototype. This one is built out of two 50′ lengths of 1/4″ outer diameter copper tubing. Without a support system it was unable to keep its shape so I built an external wooden support structure for it.

Copper tube antenna hanging underneath a wooden support structure

Copper tube antenna hanging underneath a wooden support structure

Excitedly, I actually *AM* seeing results from this thing! For more detailed construction information, as well as for initial findings and results, continue reading!

Alright, so the idea for this antenna was to use copper tubing after finding that solid copper wire didn’t do a very good job at keeping its shape. At Home Depot, I picked up a pair of 50 foot lengths of 1/4″ outer diameter copper tubing at ~$40 a piece.

Copper tubing coiled and uncoiled

Copper tubing coiled and uncoiled

Here you can see both coils lying on the ground. One is shown still in plastic as it came, the other has been stretched out. For reference, the measuring tape has been set to 4 ft. in length.

You can see the silver tube wrapped around a section of the elongated copper coil. That’s actually a spring designed to help shape the tube by hand.

Starting to shape the coil by hand

Starting to shape the coil by hand

After getting slightly beyond this point, I found it becoming exceedingly difficult to shape the thing by hand, keep everything expanding consistently, and have everything keep its shape. It works well with smaller diameter windings where the copper keeps its shape, but not so much when things get larger.

hmmm, I still need to get this thing insulated. For insulation, I opted to go with wrapping electrical tape. Turned out that this was an *incredibly* time consuming process. It easily took a good 5-6 hours PER COIL!! Fortunately my girlfriend was helping and so we each did one of the coils.

Insulating the copper tubing with electrical tape

Insulating the copper tubing with electrical tape

Instead of trying to shape each coil with the spring, which wasn’t turning out to be a very effective method, I opted to go with a different technique: I’d basically make an inner loop and use the coil itself to help shape the rest of the coil. I’d literally step on the coil and wrap the remaining lengths of tubing around itself. By stepping on the coil, that would hold the existing flat spiral on the ground. Now I could make a flat spiral on the ground that I would eventually lift up from the inside and form into a cone.

18 inch diameter insulated copper tubing spiral

18 inch diameter insulated copper tubing spiral

You can see that the windings aren’t touching each other in the above picture. Standing on the spiral during its creating, everything is tight tight. When I got off, it sort of unwound a bit a loosened up into the picture you see above.

Once I made this spiral, it was only then that I knew some very important numbers. You see, to turn this into a cone, you basically grab the small diameter circle in the middle and literally pull it up vertically into 3D. So the small diameter circle in the center is your ID, or inner diameter, and mine turned out to be roughly 3 inches. The large circle around the outside will be the large base of the antenna, and its diameter, the OD or outer diameter, turned out to be 18 inches. Counting the number of windings, I found out that I would wind up with 18 windings per cone.

Running some numbers and doing some math, I found that if I wanted to maintain the 33 degree apex as suggested by Bashar, my antenna would wind up being 31″ tall with a spacing of 1.722″ or 1 23/32″ between windings. This would definitely be large enough to fit underneath a 3 foot tall pyramid (requiring an antenna that stands 1.98 ft tall and with an OD of 1.174 ft wide) so we’re in business!!

S after making the flat spiral, the next task was to pull it up from the small diameter windings and create a cone-shape spiral.

Copper coil at 33 degrees

Copper coil at 33 degrees

A couple things I noticed:

1) The small diameter windings held their shape well while the large diameter windings collapsed under the weight.

Copper tubing coiled up; The small coils held their shape while the large coils did not

Copper tubing coiled up; The small coils held their shape while the large coils did not

2) I’d originally planned on clockwise spirals, from the large diameter base of the coil on up, but if you look at the above picture, you’ll notice in inadvertently made a counterclockwise spiral. To fix this, I simply had to push the small diameter windings back down to make the spiral flat again and go out through the other end. An easy fix.

Pair of coils ready to be joined together

Pair of coils ready to be joined together

Once we got the two spirals made, it was time to join them. The way I wanted to join them was to use a special device called a swaging tool that you hammer into the end of one tube. This basically stretches and widens the inside of the tube so that it can slide over a smaller tube.

Swaging tool used to enlarge one end of a tube so that it slides over the other tube

Swaging tool used to enlarge one end of a tube so that it slides over the other tube

With some hammering, the tip on the end of the large diameter end was enlarged enough to fit over the tip of the small diameter end.

Two copper cones joined together at the top of the antenna

Two copper cones joined together at the top of the antenna

Here’s a close-up shot of the connection.

Closeup of the top of the connected coils

Closeup of the top of the connected coils

To bond the two ends, I opted to use some super glue and then cover everything over with more tape. Solder would have probably been a better solution to be honest, and I’ll probably do that instead for future designs, but I figured super glue was easy enough.

With the top ends of the spirals/cones connected, here’s the yet-to-be-shaped antenna laying on the ground.

Collapsed connected cones

Collapsed connected cones

For a sense of scale, here’s a shot of the kitty here laying down next to the collapsed cones. 🙂

Kitty lying beside the collapsed antenna

Kitty lying beside the collapsed antenna

Now that this much was done, it’s time to start standing this antenna up and stretching the windings out so that it’s nice and tall. Since it was definitely not going to stand up underneath its own weight. I opted to hang the thing underneath a wooden support structure.

In order to keep the thing close to the top without pulling down underneath its own weight, I put some boxes underneath.

Starting to hang the antenna under the support system

Starting to hang the antenna under the support system

You can see the zip ties along the top wooden crossbars that keep the top of the antenna in place. I also zip tied it up in a way to keep the weight of the antenna off the super glued connecting joint.

As the kitty walks by, you can see the antenna being positioned into place. The boxes underneath help me zip tie the upper windings before too much weight pulls everything down.

As the kitty walks by, you can see the antenna being positioned into place. The boxes underneath help me zip tie the upper windings before too much weight pulls everything down.

Looking at this picture, you’ll see that we have the top part stating to get attached (you can see a rounded zip tie that the top left winding is hanging down from. In order to give the large upper windings in place, I used some little brass screws that screwed into the underside of the wooden crossbars. Then I used zip ties to reach down and hold the upper windings in place.

Hooks screwed into the wooden support system help hold ropes and zip ties to support the antenna

Hooks screwed into the wooden support system help hold ropes and zip ties to support the antenna

Everything was as precisely measured as possible. For example, each winding should decrease in diameter by 0.8″ and so each brass hook should be 0.4″ closer to the center than the last. The white strings that have been cut to fit are there to hold the lower levels in place. The lone white string to the left in the picture above runs down to hold the center of the antenna 15.5″ down in place. The white string on the right near the zip ties runs down to hold a bottom large winding in place.

Once I was able to get the top part somewhat supported, I was able to remove the support boxes and hang the rest of the antenna down, attaching the bottom two endpoints.

Connecting the bottoms of the two coils

Connecting the bottoms of the two coils

Again, once this was done, I covered the connection point up with electrical tape, drilled some holes in the plywood base, and zip tied the bottom of the antenna down to both keep the connection point from flexing, and to keep the base of the antenna fixed in place.

After a bunch of measuring, sculpting, and adding custom length zip ties and ropes, this was the end result:

Copper tube antenna hanging underneath a wooden support structure

Copper tube antenna hanging underneath a wooden support structure

and here’s a shot of it straight on:

Completed antenna

Completed antenna

A few things I’d like to point out…

Look at the lower half of the antenna, the wider outer windings. You’ll see a series of zip ties going down, the top of which is supported by white strings that connect up to the wooden crossbars at the top. This helped keep the outer bottom half from collapsing under its own weight. A few windings can remain unsupported, but more than 4 or 5 or so and it starts to droop quite a bit.

Also you’ll notice a black patch of electrical tape on the bottom and another section of the wooden crossbar on top taped. This was done as a way to help reduce a chance of fire when the antenna was sparked. These are where the two sections of exposed copper wire are.

Now to actually spark the antenna, I got an old extension cable, hacked off one end, and stripped the two end wires to expose the wire underneath the insulation.

Sparking wire

Sparking wire

After working through possible ways of connecting it including keeping it permanently attached to the antenna or not, I wound up opting for a removable option. Basically I’d wrap one wire along the exposed section of antenna tubing on the bottom of the antenna, plug the cord in, and then quickly tap the exposed section of copper tubing at the top of the antenna.

The picture below shows the top of the antenna with sparking wire wrapped around it, without black electrical tape wrapped around the wooden crossbar, so it’s not how I actually sparked it in the end, but it’ll give you an idea for what’s going on.

Sparking wire wrapped around exposed tubing

Sparking wire wrapped around exposed tubing

When it came time to actually start the thing up, I tested around the house’s power circuits and respective circuit breakers so that I’d know which circuit breakers would trip in case of a short circuit.

When I found the circuit I wanted to test, I took a quick trip outside and looked at the two power meters, noting how fast the discs in the center were spinning, telling me how much power was being used from the power company. With this in mind, it was time to start this bad boy up!! 😀

So again, to spark the antenna, I basically wrapped one of the power cable’s exposed wires around the bottom, plugged the cable in, and then quickly touched the exposed portion of the top inner coil.

Sparks flew. Mostly orange sparks, some green. Fortunately no fires were started so we didn’t need to use our fire extinguisher. 😉

Oddly enough, the circuit breaker didn’t trip. Everything in the house is still working normally.

Similar to previous attempts, there was physical damage on the exposed portion of the copper tube where the power cable touched the STA.

Exposed copper tubing damaged after sparking

Exposed copper tubing damaged after sparking

Once sparked, the power cable was physically removed from the STA.

So did this thing work? Well I noticed a few actual results from this thing…

First off, I noticed that one of the two power meter discs was indeed spinning differently. Woohoo!! 🙂 The one I noticed change in originally spun really quick for maybe 2-3 seconds and then really slow for 8-10 seconds. It’s almost like there was some device in the building that would suck power down every few seconds, like a heater that was turning on and off. After connecting the STA, I only saw the disc spinning slowly. No more spikes of high power usage. Was this due to the STA providing that power? I don’t know. Was this due to that device no longer turning on? I don’t know.

I checked the power meters again this morning and noticed that the disc was spinning very very quickly. Lots of power being used from the power company today, much more than last night.

Now, I am curious about the fact that when I picked up the STA and moved it to a different part of the house after sparking it last night, it did bounce around and thus change its shape a bit while being transported. Perhaps this affected its resonance capabilities and so it stopped working. Again, I don’t know. It might be necessary to try sparking it again.

Now right after I did spark it last night, I noticed that when I stood next to the thing, it felt like my body was more “lit up,” like there was more turned on energy in my body. Less so when I walked away, moreso when I stood next to it. Again, it could be some sort of power of suggestion wishful thinking thing. Again, I don’t know.

The power bill here comes every two months and the next one is scheduled to arrive very soon. So I guess it’ll be another two months or so until we receive more clear-cut confirmation as to whether or not this thing is actually working.

In the meantime, I’m curious about whether or not I should spark it again and then leave it in place so it doesn’t bounce around and possibly stop functioning properly.

The sturdiness question also makes me wonder whether or not this could be put in cars to power them. Perhaps, if we enveloped this antenna in some sort of hardening gel that keeps it in place. But then again, does it need to physically vibrate and resonate?

Are there safety issues with this thing? Does it emit some sort of harmful electromagnetic frequencies? I’d also like to find a safer way of sparking this thing.

The overall shape and distance between windings looks pretty good and this is probably one of the best designs that I currently know how to create personally, but the perfectionist in me wants everything to be juuuust right, including not only the 33 degree angle thing, but also having the windings steadily and consistently spiraling up and down. Perfectly machined spirals, something better than I could do by hand.

OH, these antennas CAN be pushed together. Initially my girlfriend and I tried screwing the cones through one another, starting at the small end of the cone. This totally didn’t work well and we wound up warping the shape of the cones, despite our best efforts. I wound up unwinding and rewinding both spirals again to make the cones. Instead, I found (and I think this is what Joakim meant by pushing them together… took me a while to figure it out…) 😉 that you can basically push the two cones together. An easy way of visualizing it is to think of one expanded cone and another flat spiral. Slide the flat spiral horizontally right into the center of the extended cone. Then start vertically expanding the flat spiral into a 3D cone so that it interpenetrates the other 3D cone.

During insertion, you might need to open up first cone and increase the size between windings to get the other spiral/cone in, but it’s actually a pretty quick and easy process. MUCH easier than trying to somehow screw two cones together.

Also, using two different colors for the insulation is something I highly recommend. As Hans and Joakim have said, it makes it much easier when you start shaping the antenna to figure out what goes up and what goes down…

That’s pretty much news for now!

Cheers! 🙂

Ariel

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Entry filed under: Completed Antenna, Construction, Experimentation.

Existing Devices that Tap into Schumann Resonance Frequencies Video of me sparking the copper tube antenna

10 Comments Add your own

  • 1. plumbing supplies  |  March 29, 2011 at 2:34 pm

    Thanks for the recommendations and the conclusions you provided. The tests were quite long and patience is really needed. Its good that the results are really made to be precise and accurate. I hope to read more from your site. Thanks again.

    Reply
  • 2. Harvesting Energy From the Sun Using Crystals - Page 13  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:58 pm

    […] […]

    Reply
  • 3. Prometheus Phoenix  |  December 8, 2011 at 3:23 am

    So cool to see someone experimenting with this idea!

    My first thought is that perhaps you should invest in a device that provides an adjustable amount of charge, and a device that can read the charge coming out. Probably sparking it from a wall outlet is a bit more power than is needed for this. If you can have a measurable, smaller amount of charge going into it, and then have a measurement of the charge coming out, seems like that would be ideal. When I say small, I mean a few volts, like the charge that is in a battery, since all you’re trying to do here is test the principle, not actually produce a useful amount of power.

    Going to be following this blog!

    Reply
  • 4. Ashton Eibeck  |  May 11, 2012 at 10:43 am

    Well done on cataloguing all this information… I find it quite useful. Although, sparking a coil, from your house outlet is dangerous – and expecting the house meter to be affected – seems far fetched. I suggest you need to harness the power via other methods. In my opinion – I think the videos showing sparking of the coil from the house outlet need to be removed – so other people don’t try and replicate that. Anyway – good work on the rest of the website. I will have some videos on youtube soon of the aerial that I have built – and the results. Cheers

    Reply
  • 5. Blade Trinity Movie Blog  |  December 30, 2012 at 12:04 pm

    Antenna Tube Cap Orange Tri30728…

    […] ally pull it up vertically into 3D. So the small diameter circle in the center i […]…

    Reply
  • 6. TicoVM  |  July 30, 2013 at 1:30 am

    Your antenna is ready… What now, next step???

    Reply
  • 7. Kapoor Sandeip  |  February 13, 2014 at 3:30 am

    So ? Did you get any usable power from the Bashar coil antenna ?

    Reply
    • 8. Ariel  |  February 17, 2014 at 10:16 pm

      I don’t think so. I think there’s more to this and I’m not sure how to start it up or tap the power out of it.

      Reply
  • 9. faithplus1  |  February 12, 2015 at 9:26 pm

    This is so cool. I love that you built that thing and tried it out. Also agree dangerous with the electric from the house outlet ahaha. Perhaps another way of making the spark? Not sure cos I’m no good with the technical stuff, but the cone you made looked just how I imagined when Bashar described it.

    Look forward to any further updates! 🙂

    Reply
  • 10. Pyro PAws  |  March 9, 2017 at 5:11 am

    Well your suppose to insulate the coils in some sort of ceramic like material to where it forms a cone shape i think. Also other ppl have gotten farther then this with it so i know much more is always possible. Curious if u have a more advanced protoype yet please email me if u do or post it. thanks . or anybody else u can do anything guys fuck doubters!

    Reply

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